U.S. Department of Energy

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Empirical Analysis of the Subjective Impressions and Objective Measures of Domain Scientists’ Visual Analytic Judgments

Publish Date: 
Friday, May 6, 2011
Scientists often use specific data analysis and presentation methods familiar within their domain. But does high familiarity drive better analytical judgment? This question is especially relevant when familiar methods themselves can have shortcomings: many visualizations used conventionally for scientific data analysis and presentation do not follow established best practices. This necessitates new methods that might be unfamiliar yet prove to be more effective. But there is little empirical understanding of the relationships between scientists’ subjective impressions about familiar and unfamiliar visualizations and objective measures of their visual analytic judgments. To address this gap and to study these factors, we focus on visualizations used for comparison of climate model performance. We report on a comprehensive survey-based user study with 47 climate scientists and present an analysis of : i) relationships among scientists’ familiarity, their perceived lev- els of comfort, confidence, accuracy, and objective measures of accuracy, and ii) relationships among domain experience, visualization familiarity, and post-study preference.
Dasgupta A., S.M. Burrows, K. Han, and P.J. Rasch. 2017. "Empirical Analysis of the Subjective Impressions and Objective Measures of Domain Scientists’ Visual Analytic Judgments." In Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2017), May 6-11, 2017, Denver, Colorado, 1193-1204. New York, New York:ACM. PNNL-SA-123318. doi:10.1145/3025453.3025882
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